Alaska Fishing Lodge: The Nature’s Abode

Alaska Fishing Lodge: The Nature’s Abode

Fishing Fun!
Source: Flickr

The popularity of fishing in many areas has continuously dominated society. That is why along with its series of activities, people now realize the need for fishing lodges especially in places where fishing activities seem never ending.

Among all fishing lodges available in the industry today, the Alaska Fishing Lodges are among the most treasured and most popular fishing lodges in the United States.

The Alaska Fishing Lodge provides its customers full customer service satisfaction with their wide array of fishing activities and endless strings of fishing fun.

Normally, Alaska Fishing Lodges are made of logs; sturdily build to provide each angler optimum convenience and comfort. It is known for its spacious interiors, creatively decorated with the right embellishments, thereby, setting the mood for fishing and wilderness.

In addition, because it carries the true Alaskan heritage, Alaska Fishing Lodges offer services and products that can be afforded by anyone. With its affordable rates, the place is inhabited by people, who mostly want to enjoy life and fishing but cannot afford to buy the pleasures in expensive beaches and lodges.

Best of all, Alaska Fishing Lodges are perfectly located in areas where the waters are abundant with the different species of fish. Usually, these lodges are situated in a place where trout, northern pike, and grayling mostly inhabit the waters.

On the other hand, most Alaska Fishing Lodges are built big enough to occupy 16 guests, in which each guest can avail of personal and individualized services.

Moreover, this type of lodge also houses a place where king salmon are abundant especially during the months of June and early part of July. Most lodges also provide a wide variety of fishing equipment, from rods to tackles and lines.

With all these beautiful features present in every Alaska Fishing Lodge, there is no better place to enjoy fishing and the wilderness like what this particular lodge can offer.

Staying in an Alaska Fishing Lodge is, indeed, an ultimate fishing experience.

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7 Tips and Tricks That Will Make You A Great Deer Hunter

Deer Hunting Tip #1: Cover Your Scent

The ability to fully cover up your scent is one of the primary determinants of whether your deer hunting sessions will be a success or not. The deer can sense human smell a mile away – not forgetting that they can also detect the smell you leave on the ground as well as in the air as you walk.

The good news is that you can easily cover up you scent and prevent the deer from detecting you by using some scent eliminator. Simply spray the bottom of your boots and hunting stand with an odor eliminator. Bathing with a scent-free soap before every hunting trip also ensures that you don’t leave your scent in the air. One more thing: always ensure that you’re downwind to your range to further prevent the game from detecting your smell.

Deer Hunting Tip #2 : Dupe the Deer

If you fall into the category of deer hunters who don’t believe in tricking deer with decoys, calls, etc., then you have been missing a lot! But it’s never too late. You can start incorporating different methods of tricking the deer into your range and thus increase your luck in the woods.

Decoys can be an excellent way to fool the deer. Modern models come with lifelike features that enable them to trick the deer easily.

As long your decoy setup is correct, you’ll surely get deer visitors to your hunting area. Other methods of duping the deer include the use of calls, e.g. the grunt tube and bleat cans and even the rattling of antlers to draw in the deer to your range for a perfect shot!

Take Note: before using the above deer tricks, it’s important to learn how and when to use them to get the most out of them.

Deer Hunting Tip #3 : Be Attractive  

You heard that right.

Using deer attractants is another strategy that veteran hunters have been using to maximize their hunting success. Fortunately, the market has all kinds of deer attractants; ranging from deer feeddeer urinedeer feeders, and so much more.

These enable you to attract the deer to your stand for easy take-down. A great example where the deer attractants have been proven to work is the use of the drag rag soaked in the doe estrus in the peak-rut season.

Often, bucks will follow these trails right to your waiting stand!

Deer Hunting Tip #4 : Try Using a Bow

Using a bow to hunt deer? Great! This part is for you.

Using a compound bow has proven to be a great asset when it comes to deer hunting and many hunters swear by it. But to enjoy the ultimate success when using your bow and arrow in the woods, you need to take care of a few things:

  • Ensure that you have the ideal bow for you: one that fits your size and strength and that you’re comfortable using.
  • Accuracy matters most: when that magical moment appears (when the buck enters your shooting range), you’ve got only one chance and your accuracy is all you need to grab the chance. Do everything to ensure you get the buck down with the first shot. Employ accuracy enhancing accessories such as the single pin bow sight. Don’t let the opportunity go!
  • Practice makes perfect: if you wait until the hunting day to use your bow, you’ll definitely fail. The surest way to hone your archery skills is by practicing shooting at different elevations and positions using readily available archery targets.
  • Use razor-sharp broadheads: most bowhunters recommend this type of arrowhead, quoting its capability to kill the game more efficiently and even leave a good blood trail.
  • Know your distance: did you know that most of the missed shots are attributed to wrong yardage estimations? When in your tree stand, try ranging the trees at different distances and use them as landmarks in your head. A rangefinder will also be helpful here.

Deer Hunting Tip #5 : Be Quiet

So you believe that after fully covering your human scent you’re safe?

You’re wrong.

Deer have excellent hearing  as well. In fact, they can quickly detect your movements from a quarter mile away on a non-windy day! And if they hear your movements, they can take around two hours to return.

You can avoid making any noise on the hunting day by setting up your stand 1-2 days before. You might also want to walk carefully and step with great care to minimize the chances of your sound spooking the deer.

Wearing special sound eliminating hunting boots or boot covers can drastically reduce the noise you make while walking.

Deer Hunting Tip #6 : Know When to Hunt

Anytime is not the time to hunt the deer…

For the most part, deer are active in the early morning as well as near dusk.This means that the best time to hunt them is early in the morning and in the evening as the sun sets.

For the evening hunts, you ought to set up your stand around the deer feeding area. And for a morning hunt, set up on its route to bedding.

It’s good to note that this strategy does not apply at all times. If you’re in the rut season, feel free to hunt at any time of the day – since the buck will show up at any place, anytime. But be sure to remain downwind of the does.

Deer Hunting Tip #7 : Know Where to Hunt

Scouting a hunting area before the hunting season is recommended.

The deer will need to feed, drink, defecate, and mate.

When and where they do all these things is what you should set out to discover so that you can secure an ideal hunting location.

Different times of the year will always put the deer into different home ranges which are easy to identify by looking for various evidence and indicators such as tracks and droppings.

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Does Hunting Help or Hurt the Environment?

Like so many hot button issues, the answer to this question depends upon who you ask. On the one hand, some say, nothing could be more natural than hunting, and indeed just about every animal species—including humans—has been either predator or prey at some point in its evolution. And, ironic as it sounds, since humans have wiped out many animal predators, some see hunting as a natural way to cull the herds of prey animals that, as a result, now reproduce beyond the environment’s carrying capacity.

On the other hand, many environmental and animal advocates see hunting as barbaric, arguing that it is morally wrong to kill animals, regardless of practical considerations. According to Glenn Kirk of the California-based The Animals Voice, hunting “causes immense suffering to individual wild animals…” and is “gratuitously cruel because unlike natural predation hunters kill for pleasure…” He adds that, despite hunters’ claims that hunting keeps wildlife populations in balance, hunters’ license fees are used to “manipulate a few game [target] species into overpopulation at the expense of a much larger number of non-game species, resulting in the loss of biological diversity, genetic integrity and ecological balance.”

Beyond moral issues, others contend that hunting is not practical. According to the Humane Society of the United States (HSUS), the vast majority of hunted species—such as waterfowl, upland birds, mourning doves, squirrels and raccoons—“provide minimal sustenance and do not require population control.”

Author Gary E. Varner suggests in his book, In Nature’s Interests, that some types of hunting may be morally justifiable while others may not be. Hunting, “designed to secure the aggregate welfare of the target species, the integrity of its ecosystem, or both”—what Varner terms ‘therapeutic hunting’—is defensible, while subsistence and sport hunting—both of which only benefit human beings—is not.

Regardless of one’s individual stance, fewer Americans hunt today than in recent history. Data gathered by the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service for its most recent (2006) National Survey of Fishing, Hunting and Wildlife-Associated Recreation, show that only five percent of Americans—some 12.5 million individuals—consider themselves hunters today, down from nine percent in 2001 and 15 percent in 1996.

Public support for hunting, however, is on the rise. A 2007 survey by Responsive Management Inc., a social research firm specializing in natural resource issues, found that 78 percent of Americans support hunting today versus 73 percent in 1995. Eighty percent of respondents agreed that, “hunting has a legitimate place in modern society,” and the percent of Americans indicating disapproval of hunting declined from 22 percent in 1995 to 16 percent in 2007.

Perhaps matching the trend among the public, green leaders are increasingly advocating for cooperation between hunters and environmental groups: After all, both lament urban sprawl and habitat destruction.

Originally posted via Scientific American

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Women and Hunting

For women and most men too, there’s an overwhelming rush and feeling that comes on strong after killing an animal. Both sexes will benefit from these words.

My father James was an excellent teacher when it came to all things outdoors. He loved hunting and wanted to share his passion with his only child. But, there was a problem. I was a tender-hearted youngster. I loved animals and wouldn’t dream of taking one’s life. I even made him release the fish we’d catch during our weekend outings. My father understood his sensitive child and knew that pressuring me to take an animal would be the worst thing he could do.

Even though I didn’t want to hunt, I loved spending time in the woods with my dad. So, throughout my kiddie years, I accompanied my father on many of his hunts as an observer only. After graduating from high school, I went off to college with the intention of becoming a veterinarian. But like many if not most college students, my future followed a different path than the one I initially wanted to pave. I became a journalist instead. When I returned home from college, I started volunteering at Alabama’s Wildlife Refuge Center. I spent most of my time there feeding orphaned animals and helping to rehabilitate injured raptors. I loved my work with the animals and found it very educational and completely rewarding.

One evening at the refuge, I overheard another volunteer discussing his upcoming deer hunt. There he was feeding a bottle to an orphaned fawn and talking about his love for deer hunting. That’s when it dawned on me. I can be compassionate toward animals, give back to nature and enjoy hunting as well.

Not long after that, I started writing for some hunting magazines, and I went on a turkey hunt. That first turkey hunt was a defining moment in my life.

I met up with turkey hunting expert Brad Harris and some women for a three-day turkey hunt in Missouri. Prior to the hunt I made up my mind that if I had the chance to take a turkey, I would do so. Well, my chance came that first day. Harris called in a bird for me, and I took the shot. The bird went down and my heart rate soared.

Harris and I ran to the downed bird. As I looked down at the fallen bird, I felt a twinge of sadness, which apparently showed up on my face. Harris responded with an understanding smile. Upon seeing his reaction, an overwhelming sense of accomplishment and pride welled up inside of me. I had finally become the hunter that would make my father proud (well, even more proud than he probably already was of me). That experience gave me a renewed appreciation for the opportunity to hunt wild creatures as my ancestors have done for generations. Although I did feel a little bit of the hunter’s remorse, hunting and taking an animal felt very natural to me, and I continue to enjoy taking part in this pastime today.

A Range of Emotions

As women who hunt, we’re often afraid to talk about or express our feelings after a kill, especially after our first kill, and especially in front of men. Many women didn’t grow up hunting, so the experience can be overwhelming to say the least. We express our emotions differently than our male counterparts, and we worry that if we cry, they’ll consider us wimpy, and if we’re too excited, they may think of us as cold-hearted.

Men that hunt with their girlfriends, daughters or wives should take into account the emotional differences between men and women. Whether a woman cries a river of tears or screams with excitement at the top of her lungs after a kill, especially a first kill, she should feel free to express those emotions as she desires. If she robs herself of this inward expression, she misses out on the true essence of the hunt.

The following women experienced an array of emotions after their first kills. None of them are ashamed of their reactions. They happily share their experiences in an effort to inspire other women to not be embarrassed by their first-kill emotions and to give men a little bit of insight into a woman’s perception of the hunt.

PR Lady Sheds a Tear

Karen Lutto, president of Lutto & Associates, Inc. (a public relations firm in the outdoor industry), said to this day she still feels a great sense of sadness after killing an animal. “I personally believe that I feel so sad because of the immense respect I have for the animals that I choose to hunt,” Lutto said. “I actually cried after taking my first few animals. I was excited, proud and sad all at the same time.”

Last spring, Lutto took her daughter Ashley on her first hunt. “Like me, Ashley also felt sad after she shot her first doe. She struggled with her emotions and didn’t really understand why she felt the way she did. I explained to her that it’s okay to cry and feel sad after you take an animal’s life. As Ashley and I continue to hunt, together we have developed a better understanding and appreciation for all that is involved with the hunt — including our emotions.”

Clean Kills Spell Relief

Some female hunters say the fact that they were able to make clean kills affected the way they responded emotionally to their first kills.

Lynn Pankey, a past executive assistant for Realtree’s vice president of marketing, says after several years of working at Realtree, she felt like she needed to give hunting a try so she’d know more about the brand she sells. Pankey’s first hunt was for turkeys at High Pines Plantation in Georgia. Like most beginners, Pankey told me that her mind was racing before she made the shot.

“I wondered if the gobbler would get close enough for me to shoot,” Pankey said. “I worried about judging the distance properly, and I worried about injuring the bird. I was a nervous wreck. But I took the shot and downed the gobbler. I was so relieved that I was able to drop the bird and not have to worry about it suffering and falling prey to other wildlife.”

Once she realized she had made a clean kill, Pankey was elated with her accomplishment. “I take hunting very seriously and practice with my firearm on a regular basis to decrease the odds that I’ll wound an animal. Knowing that I’m doing all I can to make a clean kill makes me a more confident hunter. The more a woman practices and familiarizes herself with her firearm or bow, the more confident she’ll be in the woods, and the more likely she’ll make a solid kill. Injuring an animal can be a pretty traumatic experience for anyone.”

Family Ties That Bind

Women who grew up in hunting families often experienced hunts and the harvesting of animals by family members at a very early age. So the feelings they often express after a first kill are those of accomplishment and pride.

Ginger Morehead, famed female archer and Realtree pro staffer, took her first deer when she was just seven years old. “I was raised in a hunting family, so hunting came very natural to me,” Morehead said to me at a recent camp we shared. “I was absolutely thrilled to death the first time I took a deer. My feelings about hunting have evolved as time has passed. Now that I’m older, I take more time to consider the majesty of the whitetail. As an adult, I still love hunting, but I’ve gained more respect for the animals I harvest.”

Lisa Metheny of Farmersburg, Indiana, said she felt nothing but happiness when she took her first deer. “I grew up hunting with my family and was raised to feel pride for harvesting an animal. It was an honor to take an animal in our family. We utilized the deer we took, so I didn’t have a hard time harvesting one. In fact, the first time I took a deer, I felt a great deal of accomplishment because I had practiced hard for it and was able to take the animal cleanly. I just thanked God for that magnificent animal. I was in awe of the entire experience.”

Sue Averette of Coker, Alabama, one of six girls and three boys, said hunting in her family was a necessity.

“We hunted for food,” Averette said, “So I was used to hunting and all that was involved with the sport. I took my first doe when I was probably 18. Back then, points didn’t matter. I was just thrilled to go out and take a deer and contribute to providing for my family. I felt nothing but exhilaration. Although we continue to eat venison, deer hunting is no longer a necessity but a sport for my family.”

We’re Helping Wildlife

Some women told me they felt little remorse after their first kills because other hunters had stressed to them the importance of hunting for maintaining a healthy animal population. These women hunt not only for the recreation factor but also to contribute to a healthy wildlife environment.

Kandi Kisky, co-owner of Kisky Productions and Realtree pro staffer, grew up in a non-hunting family and hunted for the first time when she met her husband Don 17 years ago. She said Don was so passionate about hunting that she thought maybe there was something to it.

“Don always brought across the importance of hunting for controlling the herd,” Kisky proudly said. “I took my first animal — a turkey when I was six months pregnant. I didn’t feel any remorse, perhaps because I understood that hunting was important for a healthy wildlife population. I was so excited about my first turkey that I was instantly hooked on the sport. Each year my passion for hunting gets stronger.”

At the End of the Day

No matter a woman’s reaction — happy, sad, boastful or calm, her first-kill emotions are nothing to be ashamed of. These women are proof that by remaining true to yourself and to your emotions, you remain true to the hunting experience.

Editor’s note: This was originally published on July 20, 2006.

This article was originally posted on Realtree by Stephanie Mallory.

Read more here: https://www.realtree.com/all/articles/the-womans-first-kill 

The Joy of Duck Hunting

Duck hunting is one of the most popular hunting sports in the world. It is as much a social calling as it is a hunt. In fact, representing a whole set of cultural standards and etiquette rules that many people do not even consider. It has a whole culture all its own, from a proper dress code to duck hunting dogs and assistants. The world of duck hunting is ripe with cultural significance, but it also has a dark side and represents a less than desirable aspect of human nature. Regardless of the point of view, there is something to be learned about duck hunting that may shed some light on either side of the ethical quandary.

Duck hunting is mainly a sporting activity around the world now, as commercial duck hunting has since been banned in most of the developed countries. Duck hunting is, in fact, as old as time itself. There are early indications that ducks and geese were somehow hunted during the Ice Age. Cave drawings indicate that duck hunting was a sound practice early on in human existence, giving way to ducks and swans appearing on cave paintings in Ice Age Europe.

With this international history, duck hunting enjoys a popularity that spreads around the world. It is especially popular in North America, where the largest number of localized ducks can be located. Most ducks use the Mississippi River as a migratory guide, so many duck hunts take place along the river to use it as a guide for finding ducks. Arkansas is a major hotbed of duck hunting, with Stuttgart being considered the “duck hunting capital of the world”.

Duck hunting is often considered popular because of its simplicity. The tools of the trade are simplistic enough, from a decoy set to a shotgun and duck call. The essence of duck hunting is based around the trickery of using the decoy and the duck call in tandem to lure the ducks out and into the air towards the decoy. After this takes place, the ducks are in open range for the hunt and the firing begins. These hunts take place around rivers, streams, lakes and any other bodies of water where ducks can be found.

There are many aspects that stand in contrast to duck hunting, of course. Most waterfowl conservation experts agree that the hunting of any type of waterfowl does little to help any situation. In fact, most marsh and wetland areas are shrinking at tremendous rates, giving rise to the criticism that duck hunting effectively diminishes an already diminishing habitat. There are several organizations that constantly spar with duck hunters over this reality.

Still, some hunters ignore this philosophy and have no interest in any protection of habitats. They, instead, pillage the duck areas and hunt ducks that should not be hunted. Duck hunting remains a controversial sport because of this aspect, unfortunately, and will continue to have a dark side as long as hunters remain blissfully ignorant as to the realities of organizations such as Ducks Unlimited. Without the cooperation of hunters and marshland protectors, duck hunts may be a thing of the past.

 

Why Camping Makes the Ultimate Family Vacation

Are you and your family interested in taking a family vacation soon? If you are, have you decided what you would like to do or where you would like to go? If you have yet to decide what you would like your next family vacation to be about, you may want to take the time to look at camping. Camping is a fun way to spend your next family vacation.

Camping is often referred to as one of America’s favorite pastimes. There are a number of different reasons for that, as well as reasons as to why camping is great for family trips and vacations.

One of the many reasons why camping is perfect for family vacations is because camping is an activity that is ideal for individuals of all different ages. For example, there are many parents who actually take their newborns camping with them. It is more than possible for you to go camping with your children, even younger children, as long as you make sure that you keep an eye on them at all times.

Another one of the many reasons why camping makes for great family vacations is because camping comes in a number of different formats. For instance, camping vacations can be as short as one day or they can last for a week or longer. This means that you can plan your next family camping vacation around you and your family. In addition to the length of your camping adventure, you will also find that you can camp a number of different ways. For instance, camping is often done in traditional camping tents or in motor homes. When deciding how you and your family would like to camp, you may want to think about what would be best or easiest for you and your family.

The activities that you and your family will have access to is another one of the many reasons why camping is great for family vacations. Although camping is considered a fun activity all on its own, you will find that it isn’t the only activity that you and your family can participate in. In the United States, a large number of campground parks have onsite swimming pools, onsite lakes, onsite playgrounds, and onsite hiking trails. What does this mean for you? It means that, in addition to camping, you and your family may enjoy swimming, boating, fishing, hiking, and much more!

The cost of camping is another one of the many reasons why camping makes for great family vacations. Although you will likely be charged an admission fee or a camping fee to camp at a public campground park, you will likely find the cost very affordable. The supplies and camping equipment that you need is also extremely affordable, as most of the supplies can be purchased for discounted prices, both online and in store.

As it was previously mentioned, camping is great for family vacations. It is a fun activity that is ideal for just about anyone, no matter what the age. As fun and exciting as camping can be, it is important that you remember to keep an eye on your children at all times, especially younger children. Although camping can be a fun and exciting activity, it is one that can also be dangerous.

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Inside Bass Fishing Tips And Techniques

Fishing makes great fun! Whether you fish for a living or for pure hobby, you have to be as smart as a fisherman should be.

Every smart fisherman has his own fishing techniques that allow him to catch the fish he has in mind. Like in bass fishing or fishing in fresh waters, the fisherman will always have to use bass fishing techniques suitable for the kind of waters he is fishing in.

The first consideration in developing bass fishing techniques that can bring you your dream catch is to choose the shore you are starting on.

You also have to be very in tune with the weather. Bass fishing is most productive in the Great Lakes and similar to the ocean, these Great Lakes are very dangerous if bad weathers occur.

That is why it is most ideal to do bass fishing during summer, especially if the place you choose to have your bass fishing adventure is a big lake, such as, Lake Erie.

The other thing to consider in bass fishing is if you’re going off-shore fishing or fishing on the shoreline.

When you are fishing in the deep, make sure that your boat is fully equipped with the proper safety devices. You must also know the regulations imposed by your state regarding bass fishing in respective areas.

Some fishermen use the trolling techniques in the deep sea fishing or off-shore fishing to catch more fish.

If you choose to bass fish on the shorelines, you only need small boats and minor fishing gadgets.

You may also want to watch out for waters that are very clear. If the water is clear, most fishermen are not able to make a good catch because bass fishes prefer discolored water. In fact, smallmouth bass fishes and many other species do not even stay in clear waters.

The contour of the underwater terrain is also something to consider when bass fishing. You may consult an expert in the terrain of the lake you are fishing and he will guide you to the best place to fish.

Of course your choice of fishing gadgets will spell much of your success in bass fishing. Choose the most durable hooks that will hold firm when opportunity is given.

The choice of baits is crucial. There are plastic baits that are okay; however, natural baits such as worms and flies are much better.

During the summer, one bass fishing technique is choosing to fish along Long Point Bay at Lake Erie. This is because during this time, the bass fishes, especially the smallmouth bass fishes, are swimming through the Bay on their way back to the main lake after their spawning period.

If you are an amateur in bass fishing, the best thing to do is to fish with a companion who is an expert in the field not only in fishing but also an expert in the flora and fauna of the river you are cruising or fishing in.

As a beginner, you may opt to fish only in the shorelines of the lake or you may try fishing in the smaller lakes. Smaller lakes offer a variety of bass fishes including the smallmouth bass and the white bass.

Bass fishing in the rivers is also fruitful to beginners. Catch that catfish and its fun. There are rivers with runs and pools and in many cases fish are stacked up in these areas where catching them is as easy as eating nuts.

Plan your summer bass fishing accordingly by developing and adopting bass fishing techniques suitable to the waters you aim to explore and the fish you wish to catch.

Bass fishing techniques vary from one situation with another. The few ideas presented to you here may help you in deciding and planning your next bass fishing adventure.

Lastly, please bear in mind that safety is the must be technique to adopt in any endeavor. Always check your gadgets for any defect and if you will use a boat, it has to be a licensed one.

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Hiking Gear: Packing Tips

More and more people today enjoy the simple, wholesome fun of hiking. Hiking is an affordable, yet healthy and emotionally rewarding way to spend a vacation or a long weekend – and you don’t need to visit a travel agent.

Experienced hikers will always tell you that every detail matters when you pack hiking gear, especially tents and camping stoves. The right hiking gear and clothing, a properly and ergonomically packed backpack, positive mood and good fitness – all these elements play an equally important role in the success of any hiking trip.

Hiking boots are the most important part of your hiking gear. The right footwear will serve you longer and take you farther and safer than any training shoes or sneakers will. You can wear a cheaper pair of pants or an old t-shirt, but a good reliable pair of hiking shoes or boots should be as expensive as you can afford.

Many people consider their jackets as another important clothing item for a hiker, especially in the colder periods of the year. A hiking jacket can be a true lifesaver if you choose well. A Gore-Tex top layer will shield you from cold, wet, and windy weather. Many hiking jacket manufacturers use a layering approach in their jackets, so that an outer shell layer becomes not insulation, but goes over insulating clothing. Underneath a Gore-Tex layer your can wear a lightweight and even trendy fleece jacket, which you can use in warmer months and for other sporting activities too.

If you’re planning to camp in mountain regions during all three hiking seasons, spring, summer, and fall, then having a hiking tent is a must. Hiking tents can be used for protection from storms, winds, small animals and insects. Bringing a sleeping bag and an insulating ground pad are both very helpful as well. The insulating ground pad will help bring warmth as well as flatten out the bumpy ground.

A lightweight, dependable backpacking stove is much easier to use than campfires which are often prohibited in certain areas. Higher end models often do not require the use of matches or a lighter; however. it is always a good idea to pack matches anyway in case of ignition failure. Another version of a camping stove is a storm cooker which basically consists of a spirit burner with windshield and handle and a pot or pan for cooking. These stoves are lightweight because you don’t need a propane container, but are sufficient for one or two people only.

The newest models of camping stoves are environmentally friendly, odor-free, and very accommodating. To cook and eat take a pot, spoon, and a cup. To start the camping stove, if you don’t have an ignition feature, lighters are more reliable than matches. Take more fuel than you initially planned – camping stoves “eat” more fuel in cold weather.

To fully enjoy your hiking trip you must prepare beforehand. Even a small mistake in selecting your hiking equipment may result in an injury or at the least in discomfort and a negative experience. Check and fire up your camping stove while still at home and double check your hiking gear and equipment using a hiking checklist before you head out.

When you return from your hiking expedition, be sure to shower and wash your body from the, sometimes, harsh natural elements. A bath and body necessity is the Realtree 3-in-1 shampoo, conditioner, body wash combo! It is available in the top selling Signature for Him scent.

Happy hiking!

 

 

Does Hunting Help or Hurt the Environment?

Does hunting help or hurt the environment? Like so many hot button issues, the answer to this question depends upon who you ask. On the one hand, some say, nothing could be more natural than hunting, and indeed just about every animal species—including humans—has been either predator or prey at some point in its evolution. And, ironic as it sounds, since humans have wiped out many animal predators, some see hunting as a natural way to cull the herds of prey animals that, as a result, now reproduce beyond the environment’s carrying capacity.

On the other hand, many environmental and animal advocates see hunting as barbaric, arguing that it is morally wrong to kill animals, regardless of practical considerations. According to Glenn Kirk of the California-based The Animals Voice, hunting “causes immense suffering to individual wild animals…” and is “gratuitously cruel because unlike natural predation hunters kill for pleasure…” He adds that, despite hunters’ claims that hunting keeps wildlife populations in balance, hunters’ license fees are used to “manipulate a few game [target] species into overpopulation at the expense of a much larger number of non-game species, resulting in the loss of biological diversity, genetic integrity and ecological balance.”

Beyond moral issues, others contend that hunting is not practical. According to the Humane Society of the United States (HSUS), the vast majority of hunted species—such as waterfowl, upland birds, mourning doves, squirrels and raccoons—“provide minimal sustenance and do not require population control.”

Author Gary E. Varner suggests in his book, In Nature’s Interests, that some types of hunting may be morally justifiable while others may not be. Hunting “designed to secure the aggregate welfare of the target species, the integrity of its ecosystem, or both”—what Varner terms ‘therapeutic hunting’—is defensible, while subsistence and sport hunting—both of which only benefit human beings—is not.

Regardless of one’s individual stance, fewer Americans hunt today than in recent history. Data gathered by the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service for its most recent (2006) National Survey of Fishing, Hunting and Wildlife-Associated Recreation, show that only five percent of Americans—some 12.5 million individuals—consider themselves hunters today, down from nine percent in 2001 and 15 percent in 1996.

Public support for hunting, however, is on the rise. A 2007 survey by Responsive Management Inc., a social research firm specializing in natural resource issues, found that 78 percent of Americans support hunting today versus 73 percent in 1995. Eighty percent of respondents agreed that “hunting has a legitimate place in modern society,” and the percent of Americans indicating disapproval of hunting declined from 22 percent in 1995 to 16 percent in 2007.

Perhaps matching the trend among the public, green leaders are increasingly advocating for cooperation between hunters and environmental groups: After all, both urban sprawl and habitat destruction.

Orginally posted via Scientific American

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Explore the Land of the Midnight Sun in Juneau, Alaska

Known as the land of the midnight sun, Alaska is one of the most exciting destinations on the planet for anyone with a sense of adventure. The state capital, Juneau, is located on the panhandle that makes up the Southeastern region of Alaska. It’s a perfect base for exploring massive glaciers, whale watching, and other outdoor activities. However, the city is sandwiched in between a rugged mountain range and the Pacific Ocean, making it only accessible by air or ferry travel. Fortunately, there are plenty of great hotels in Juneau.

 

The city itself is an excellent place to relax. It became the capital during the Alaska gold rush and is a treasured place in resident’s hearts. The weather is surprisingly nice; even the winters aren’t as cold as those in Chicago or Cleveland! It has a small-town vibe and is populated by fishermen, state legislators, artists, and Alaska natives. There are excellent restaurants and at least one excellent brewing company that are worth paying a visit to while in town. City events include music festivals, craft markets, and even a salmon derby during the summer fishing season. It’s a great place to plan expeditions into the surrounding region. When tourists eventually need to crash after all the excitement, plenty of hotels in Juneau offer excellent accommodation options.

 

The city is surrounded by miles and miles of hiking trails through rugged terrain and up into the mountains around the city. Mountain biking and kayaking are also excellent options for those inclined to explore. Boats take tourists out into the Pacific to spot humpback whales. Even larger than the whales, one of the biggest draws in the area is the Mendenhall Glacier, only 13 miles from downtown Juneau. It’s part of the Juneau Icefield, a massive network of 38 interconnected glaciers that covers more than 1,500 square miles. Many different agencies offer trips to bring tourists to see the glacier. Some operators will drive to the glacier, but one of the coolest options is a helicopter trip that actually lands on the ice. Trekking up icy ridges and peering into deep blue crevasses is an experience unlike any other in the world.

 

At the end of an exhausting day it’s time to retire to one of those hotels in Juneau for a bit of relaxation before hitting one of the local pubs. It’s a refreshing, healthy, and exciting place for enjoying life.